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RERA Registration Process
Property

RERA Registration Process

The Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Act (hereafter referred to as “RERA”) came into force on 1 May 2016. The main idea behind this law was the regulation and promotion of the real estate sector. Now development projects in real estate need to register themselves under RERA. RERA provides credibility to real estate projects and protects customers against delays in handing over the projects. 

How to Register Projects under RERA?

The process of Application for Registration of Real Estate projects differs from state to state. The detailed procedure for each state is available on each state’s RERA website. The promoters and real estate agents have to apply for registration on the website, which is relevant for their state. For registration, you need to submit certain documents along with the application. These, too, differ from state to state. However, certain documents are common amongst most of the states. These are:

  • Promoter’s PAN Card;

  • Legal title deeds of the land. (See Section 4(2)(l)A);

  • Encumbrance Certificate (See Section 4(2)(l)B);

  • Commencement Certificate (See Section 4(2)(c));

  • The Sanction Plan, Layout Plan, location details of the project (See Section 4(2)(d));

  • The plan of development works; and

  • Details of previous project experience of the promoter, if any (See Section 4(2)(b)).

Some of these documents across different states (as mentioned on their websites) are as follows:

  • Name, type, and registered address of the enterprise;

  • Registration Certificate, Memorandum of Association (MoA), Articles of Association (AoA) and date of incorporation of the promoter’s enterprise;

  • Audited balance sheets of the last three financial years;

  • Audited report and director’s report of the last three years; and

  • Name, address, contact details, and photographs of the promoter/director/partners/chairman/ or any other authorized person.

What Are the Key Benefits?

Before RERA, the real estate industry was in shambles. Customers faced delays, there was no regulation, and there was widespread corruption and high-handedness of real estate agents and builders. We see the following key benefits after RERA came into the picture: 

  • Carpet Area: A statutory definition of carpet area dispels the doubts regarding its determination. Promoters decided on carpet areas before RERA came into being. 

  • Buyers can seek information regarding the projects (Section 19, Clauses 1 & 2): Buyers under RERA can seek information such as completion status, plan layout, stages of construction, etc.

  • Delaying projects led to consequences for the promoter: Under RERA, each promoter has to give a due date on which they will hand over the possession of the property to the buyer. If the promoter cannot complete the project by this date,he can face penal consequences. 

  • Liability of promoters:  If there is any structural defect or flaw in constructing a property, the allottee may bring up such an issue to the notice of the promoter and the promoter will be obligated to rectify such flaws within 30 days. If the promoter does not do the same, the allottee will need to be compensated for such structural defects.

  • Advance Payments up to 10%: Under RERA, the builders cannot demand advance payments that are more than 10% of the project's total value.

  • The buyers were given rights in case of false promises: If the allottee finds themselves in a position where the initial promises made by the promoter are not being kept, or there is a mismatch in the commitment between the parties, the allottee under this Act, has the right to withdraw from the project and get a full refund (sometimes with interest or compensation).

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Impact On Home Buyers

Homebuyers now have the following rights under RERA: 

  • Buyers need not pay for the walls area, as the definition of carpet area is now clear. 

  • Builders need to disclose information, establishing transparency between the buyers and builders.

  • Registration manifests the credibility of builders and real estate agents. 

  • RERA also prevents indefinite delays in project development and misappropriation of funds. 

  • Asking for refunds in case of uncompleted projects is also easier under RERA. 

Impact On Real Estate Agents

RERA has the following impact on real estate agents:

  • Real estate agents now have to mandatorily register themselves and also keep renewing this registration. 

  • If a real estate agent is not registered, he will have to pay penalties. 

  • Real estate agents will have to maintain accounts, books, records, etc. 

  • They should display their registration number at all times, especially in the advertisements they place. 

  • False advertisements will attract a penalty. 

Penalties

Various penalties under RERA are:

  • Section 60: We already know that a promoter has to register themselves under Section 4 of RERA. For furnishing false information, a penalty of up to 5% of the approximate cost of the real-estate project needs to be paid.

  • Section 61: Just like in the previous section, even if the promoter violates any other provision of RERA (i.e., other than Sections 3 & 4), the same amount of penalty can be levied against them.

  • Section 63:  For non-compliance with RERA authority order, a penalty upto 5% per day gets levied on the promoter. 

  • Section 64: For failure to comply with the order of the RERA tribunal, a promoter may also face imprisonment. 

  • Section 62: If the real-estate agent violates the provisions of Section 9 & 10, they will be required to pay ₹ 10,000 per day till such default continues.


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RERA Laws Across India

Till now, every state has notified the rules for their respective state authority under RERA. The only exception here is the state of Nagaland, which is under process to notify the rules.

Most states have launched their websites regarding the same. However, in this regard, some north-eastern states (such as Assam, Manipur, Arunachal Pradesh, and Sikkim) and Jammu & Kashmir, Ladakh, and NCT of Delhi are lagging.

West Bengal refused to implement RERA and enacted its legislation called, “Housing and Industrial Regulation Act, 2017,” challenged in the Supreme Court.

Several states have implemented a diluted form of RERA. This has increased difficulties for homebuyers in these states.

RERA is forward-looking legislation, and before buying a house, you should always check the RERA registration of the builder and the real estate agent. If you are in the real estate business, make sure to comply with the provisions of RERA.

Consulting a Lawyer is always useful for quick and authentic information about RERA Act

What is RERA Act
Property

What is RERA Act

Like all laws, RERA Act also has certain legalese in it. There are certain legal terms which are not easily understood by the common people. We try to simplify these legal terms for you and bring a ready explainer for the same.

Let us explore some of the real estate jargons in the RERA Act.

Carpet Area

RERA Act defines carpet area as the “net usable floor area of an apartment”. Carpet area excludes the area of external walls, lifts, balconies etc. Internal walls however fall under the definition of carpet area. Before RERA, the definition of carpet area was not legally given and hence, there was a lot of confusion regarding this. The builders often took advantage of this ambiguity. With a clear definition in place, homebuyers can now rest assured. 

Consulting a Lawyer is always useful for quick and authentic information about RERA Act.

Super Built-Up Area

Before we understand super built-up area, it is important to understand the meaning of built-up area. Built up area includes all areas of your flat (carpet area + balconies, walls etc.). Super built-up area includes built-up area plus your proportional share in the common areas of your building. For instance, if your building has common pathways, parks etc., these would also be included in the term super built-up area, in proportion to your share in them.

Typical common areas included in a super built-up area are: 

  • Staircases

  • Lobbies

  • Lifts

  • Club house

  • Security rooms

However, the super built-up area, does not include the following: 

  • Underground water facilities. 

  • Open swimming pools and skywalks

  • Open sports amenities. 

Occupancy Certificate

An occupancy certificate is the evidence that the building is inhabitable and that its construction is in compliance with all rules and regulations. It is issued by a local government, agency or planning authority. It is the developer of the building who needs to obtain the occupancy certificate. Occupancy certificate needs to be shown at the time of obtaining public utility connections. Typically, a developer applies for an occupancy certificate within 30 days of the completion of the project. The developer or the person applying for an occupation certificate should furnish the following documents: 

  • Project commencement certificate

  • Project completion certificate

  • NOCs for fire and pollution

  • Sanctioned plan of the building. 

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RERA Registration Number

RERA mandates that all real estate developers register under it. RERA registration acts as a stamp of credibility. Once the registration process of RERA registration is complete, the real-estate developers obtain a RERA registration number. This RERA registration number acts as a proof of authenticity that the project is credible and that buyers can put their money in it. 

Floor Space Index

Floor space index, also known as Floor area ratio, is the ratio of the built up area to the total land of the project. Floor space index is important as it indicates the total area that can be built upon a plot of land. The development control regulation department and the building code of India regulate the floor space index. The type of building, which city it is located in and the amenities available in the building are factors taken into account while determining the floor space index. Floor space index helps in maintaining the ratio of open space to closed spaces and helps in sustainable development of cities. 

Leasehold Property

A property which has been taken on lease is a leasehold property. Builders and real-estate developers, build their projects either on leasehold properties or freehold properties. Leasehold properties are typically on lease from 30 to 99 years. Once, the leasehold period gets over, they convert to freehold properties. Buyers prefer freehold properties to leasehold properties, as certain restrictions operate on leased land. 

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Freehold Property

A freehold property absolutely belongs to the owner. The developer may purchase the same form the owner for the purposes of development of the project. Unlike leasehold properties, no statutory approval is required to transfer the ownership of a freehold property. It is easier to get loans for freehold properties and no restrictions are imposed on the same. 

Pre-Launch Properties

You would have heard about pre-launch properties or pre-launch offers. A pre-launch property is a property whose launch has been announced, even before the approval process is underway. Typically, builders solicit offers from customers, who could be old customers or through real-estate agents a discounted prices for pre-launch offers. Such offers and properties attract potential buyers’ attention as they are available at prices lower than the market value. 

These are a few terms or legal jargons which are widely used in the real-estate sector. RERA Act, also uses these terms in its provisions. It is hence, important that you as a customer should know what these jargons mean and make an informed decision, while buying any property. 

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Duplicate Land Registration Document Process
Property

Duplicate Land Registration Document Process

Moving houses is a pain! Often in the process of moving, we end up losing important documents. A land registration document as proof of ownership. Losing a land registration document may not bode very well for you. You do not have to worry as there is a provision to obtain a duplicate land registration document.

People who read this Article also Consulted a Lawyer about Property Registration process. 

How to get a duplicate land registration Document?

You should follow certain steps in order to get your duplicate land registration document. These steps are: 

  • File a police complaint

A land registration document is a crucial document. If it gets lost, then you should file a complaint with the police. The owner of the house should only file this complaint. He should also explain the complaint and state that the original documents were lost, misplaced, or stolen. Keep the copy of the complaint filed as it may be used to obtain the duplicate land registration document. 

  • Give an advertisement in the newspaper

Like with all lost things, one should publicize that a land registration document is lost and give the return address in the advertisement. If, within a certain time, no one comes forward to return the document, then you can proceed to the next step. 

  • Make an Application for the Certified Copy of the Land Registration Document

You will have to obtain a Form 22 application, either online or from the sub-registrar’s office. Fill this form and submit it with the sub-registrar to obtain a duplicate land registration document. If the document you have lost/misplaced is a patta record, you also have to apply it to the revenue office. 

  • A duplicate copy of the Land Registration Document

Once you have applied to receive the certified copy of the document, you need to pay a certain fee to the relevant department. After the fee has been paid, a duplicate copy of your land registration document shall be issued. Many would think that what if I had a photocopy, could I use that? The answer is no! You should always try to get a legally certified copy of the document which is lost. A land registration record is proof of ownership, and hence, you should always follow the due procedure of obtaining a duplicate copy of the land registration. 

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Documents Required to Obtain Duplicate Land Registration Copy

When you apply for a duplicate land registration copy, you should also accompany your application with certain documents. These documents are: 

  • Copy of FIR: As a first step, you should always file a complaint with the police. Keep the copy of the complaint with you and attach it with the application you file before the sub-registrar to get a duplicate copy of your land registration document. 

  • Copy of newspaper advertisement: You should also attach a copy of the advertisement you published in the newspaper along with your application form. This would enable the sub-registrar to know that you still have not found the lost/misplaced document despite trying. 

  • Copy of share certificates issued: Typically, you are given share certificates when you buy a piece of land. Keep them secure and attach copies of them when applying for a certified duplicate copy of land registration. 

  • Notarized undertaking: A notarized undertaking should also be given along with the application form. 

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Obtaining a duplicate copy of the land registration document should not be a harrowing experience if you know all the right steps to take. Remember to keep all your documents in order before applying for a certified duplicate copy of the land registration record.